Prague's Only Guide With Style...

 

Welcome to the Archives of Velvet Magazine! For those of you who might not know, Velvet was Prague's first city magazine and sadly published just a few issues. I, Jeffree from Think Magazine, designed the very last issue of Velvet, which was killed the day it was to go to press... and thus, I turned my attention to making Think. A lot of the contact, adresses and business information here is too old to be useful, but why not take a walk down memory lane and enjoy yourself?



By Susannah Rosenstock

izi David thinks everyone is two-faced. His current show (through August 27 at Galerie Rudolfinum) proves the point. Those unfamiliar with David's black and white photographic portraits will be drawn in immediately by the sheer novelty of his concept, He takes photos of politicos, artists, writers, scientists, and athletes, splits them down the center, and makes two new photos, one face of two right halves, the other of two left. At first glance this can come across as a one-liner, the punch line being that these "portraits" no longer portray the people we are so used to seeing. So what are they?

David, a Czech-born professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague (FAMU) who also works with video, installations, and paintings, spent the last year-and-a-half working on the "Hidden Image" project. He has created 91 pairs of distinctly revealing photographs. The more recognizable subjects include Allen Ginsberg, Martina Navratilova, Vaclav Havel, and Dennis Hopper. The list of those unwilling to participate (for scheduling problems or just plain fear) is as long as those who were, and includes such icons as Ronald Reagan, Woody Allen, Jack Nicholson, and Mother Theresa, who did, however, send her prayers.

When you get past the initial punch line, the portraits begin to reveal the physical asymmetry inherent in all people: uneven eyebrows, a bump in the nose, a beauty mark. The two lobes of the brain cause facial asymmetry. The right, creative hemisphere controls the muscles of the left side of the face, and the more analytical left hemisphere, the right side. (In left-handed people, this is reversed). The dissimilarities between the "left" and "right" portraits are frequently striking; suddenly the lifelong veil is lifted as each side is given a full human face. No longer able to hide in the camouflage of asymmetry, normally covert personalities emerge; we get the white and the black, instead of the grey we see every day.

It is as if each face is a pointillist painting, made up of small dots of different colors, which David separates so as to reveal the parts of the whole, the process behind the finished product,
one begins to understand that asymmetry is one of nature's more complex defense mechanisms. In the case of humans, apparently, the defense reaches into regions so far beyond the physical that one senses something at work that the intellect alone cannot grasp. When these celebrity faces, which we thought we knew so well, are stripped of their public masks, the true person, perhaps, is revealed. This is a haughty claim, and only the subjects themselves know its ultimate truth.

Those who have doubts might try the experiment, if, unlike Ronald Reagan, they dare. It's cheaper than therapy.

 

 

Cover credits

  Pg. 07 Editor's Letter
  Pg. 09 FIRST: Ghost Busker
  Pg. 10 The King is Dead
  Pg. 10 Kik's Kaka
  Pg. 11 Trick of the Trade
  Pg. 11 Telephone Obsessive
  Pg. 12 The H.O.G.s are here
  Pg. 12 Fugazers
  Pg. 13 Windex
  Pg. 14-15 POLAROID: Laurie Anderson
  Pg. 17 Letter From L.A.
  Pg. 18-19 6 Kc and Peace of Mind
  Pg. 20-23 Velvet Devolution
  Pg. 24-27 FASHION: Cafe Couture
  Pg. 31 REVIEW: Jiri David's "Hidden Image"
  Pg. 32 Czech Cubism 1911-1919
  Pg. 33 REVIEW: Klub Lavka
  Pg. 33 REVIEW: Subway Club
  Pg. 34 MUSIC: The Ecstacy of St. Theresa
  Pg. 36 RESTAURANTS: Here's the Boeuf
  Pg. 37 RESTAURANTS: Comedy Cafe Akropolis
  Pg. 42 COFFEE: Meduza Kavarna
  Pg. 43 ALTERNAMALL: Jilska 22
  Pg. 44 SHOPS: Ligne Roset
  Pg. 45 Above & Beyond
  Pg. 47-48 BOOKS: Expat Mixed Bag
  Pg. 50-51 MUSIC REVIEWS
  Pg. 54-55 MOVIES: Karlovy? Very.
  Pg. 52 Scene
  Pg. 53 LAST: Intro to Cool.
   
 

Volume 1, Number 1
August 1995

Editor and Publisher MICHAEL WAYNE JR.

Executive Editor CHRISTOPHER HOLLAND

Senior Editors
WALTER R. DEVINE, JOYCE-ANN GATSOULIS

Associate Editor
SUSANNAH ROSENSTOCK

Editorial Assistants
HELENA SIPKOVA
MAURA GEDID

Contributing Editors NICHOLE ACHS
OMRI BEN-AMOS
MATT WELCH

Contributing Writers RADHA BURGESS, LOU CHARBONNEAU, DAVID FREELING, JOHN HECK, MARKETA JIRASKOVA, ANNE RENAHAN, JENNIFER TORPIE, LAURA ZAM


Creative Director GERMAIN E. DESEVE

Senior Designer
CLARE MANIAS

Production Associates STEVE ROWLAND
D.A. STRUBLE

Staff Photographer ZUZANA OPLATKOVA

Contributing Photographers
SEAN GALLUP,
AHMED RAHIM

Publicity
MICHELLE LEGGE


Advertising Director CHRISTOPHER LOVERING


The Prague Review s.r.o.

CEO: NICOLAS R. PERKlN

CFO: DAN ROSE

COO: MICHAEL WAYNE JR.

Main Offices:
Velvet Towers East
Zitna 30, 120 00 Prague 2

Editorial: 24 22 29 37
Production: 24 22 30 35
Advertising: 24 23 23 04
Voicemail: 430 430 ext. 82

Velvet is a publication of the Prague Review, s.r.o. (c) 1995, The Prague Review, s.r.o. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited by law.

Printed in the Czech Republic.

Produced entirely on Apple Macintosh.